Compound Bow or Recurve Bow?

One of the most common questions that people new to archery will ask is that should I buy a compound or a recurve bow?

CompoundTraditional_graphicIn case you are not sure what a bow is, a recurve bow is what most would imagine to be closer to a traditional style of archery. The defining feature is the limbs curving away from the archer. Recurve bow can range from simple wooden recurves to modern metal designs and can include the attachment that are standard in modern competition. Although the attachments look complex, the bow’s function and technique are fundamentally simple.

A compound bow is a modern evolution. It utilises stiffer limbs and a pulley cam system to create a much more efficient bow. The bow can be harder to raw. The best compound bow for the money is more accurate. Most compound shooters use a mechanical release aid which eliminates the inconsistency of a finger draw. In short, a compound bow is designed to deliver accuracy with every shot.

There are some types of archery: longbow, horsebow, and other forms. Longbowmen often find it easier to simply enjoy their shooting. The key factor, however, is readily available they are based on supply and local laws. Many states and countries restrict crossbows and consider them as a weapon, requiring a licence to own and many archery clubs don’t allow them for this reason. And on that note, you don’t need a licence to own a recurve or a compound bow.

Compound bow’s accuracy is unmatched and assuming equal skill. A compound will always outshoot a recurve bow. That means not just nines and tens. If everything is set up correctly and you’ve acquired decent form, you should be getting these scores. But compound shooters can be very tense and stressful because the bow doesn’t most of the work. If anything lands the red or worse, there are a lot of disappointments. Although it can easier to get those higher scores, competition can be brutally difficulty due to the high expectations.

A recurve shooter, on the other hand, will find it easier to accept that they will not always hit the gold. A recurve archer doesn’t really care about how many feet per second they can get from their bow. A recurve shooter does not pick their bow to get high scores. The focus is more on the physical side of the shot process. Recurve shooters enjoy the feet of making the shot. The cimplicity of the recurve makes it more appealing to some. Technology isn’t as important as the bow is less sensitive to inconsistencies. It literally is something you can pick up and shoot without worrying about being set to right draw length or alignment. The recurve bow is also easier to take apart whereas a compound requires a bow press to remove the cables. On the competition level, there is a greater skill gap between recurve archers. This means that a recurve archer is more focused on achieving a personal best whereas a compound bow archer is more likely to count how many times they go outside of the 10 circle.

Using compound bow can be more forgiving and generally you don’t need to shoot as frequently in order to get higher scores. A compound bow is designed to shoot as close to perfection as possible.

Share